Not our game introduction

Family violence prevention for sports clubs and teams

“Sport has the power to change the world. It has the power to unite in a way that little else does. It speaks to youth in a language they understand. Sport can create hope where once there was only despair.” Nelson Mandela.

Playing your part

Sports clubs and organisations play an important part in the lives of New Zealanders and provide a good opportunity to address our country’s high rate of family violence.

“We needed to change the culture around the game. The violence, the stigma and the gang affiliations were painting us in a really poor light,” Counties Manukau Rugby League Staff.

Doing something about family violence within your club or sporting body acknowledges that we can all have a part to play to ensure that every person in New Zealand lives in a safe, violence–free home.

No matter how big or small your club, there are many things you can do to prevent family violence. Simple actions can send powerful messages out to players, coaches, volunteers, their families, sponsors and the community as a whole that family violence is not OK, that it is OK to ask for help and to help others.

This toolkit contains suggestions about how to increase understanding of family violence and encourage violence-free behaviour in your club, organisation and community.

You can start small or go big. Your club has an opportunity to create a culture that is healthy and respectful, that makes sure everyone understands what is OK and what is not OK, and where to go for help.

You can help people to recognise and safely respond to family violence, and help them to connect with a specialist service that can help.

Whatever you decide to do, help and free resources are available on our website www.areyouok.org.nz

We encourage you to connect with a family violence network or organisation in your area. You can find a list of services via our website www.familyservices.govt.nz

No matter how big or small your club, there are many things you can do to prevent family violence.

 

Family violence is a serious problem

An average of 13 women, 10 men, and 9 children are killed each year as a result of family violence.

Family violence is a serious problem

  • About half of all homicides in NZ are committed by an offender that is identified as family.
  • A family violence investigation was recorded on average every five and a half minutes by NZ Police in 2014.
  • There were 101,981 family violence investigations recorded by NZ Police in 2014.
  • In the four years from 2009 to 2012, an average of 13 women, 10 men, and 9 children were killed each year as a result of family violence.
  • 29 per cent of women and 9 per cent of men have experienced sexual victimisation.
  • Disabled women are between 1.4 and 1.9 times more likely to be victims of violence or abuse than other women.
  • More than 14 per cent of young people report being hit or physically harmed on purpose by an adult at home in the last 12 months.
  • Of young people – 20 per cent of girls and 9 per cent of boys report unwanted sexual touching or being forced to do sexual things.
  • 50 per cent of Intimate Partner Violence deaths occurred at a time of actual or intended separation.
  • 1 in 3 women experience physical and/or sexual abuse from a partner in their lifetime.
  • 76 per cent of recorded assaults against females are committed by an offender that is identified as family.
  • 74 per cent of violent incidents committed by a partner are not reported to Police.
  • In the four years from 2009 to 2012, 76% of intimate partner violence-related deaths were perpetrated by men, 24% were perpetrated by women.
  • It is estimated that between 2-5% of the older population in New Zealand experience some form of elder abuse.
  • Family violence is estimated to cost the country between $4.1 and $7 billion each year.
  • 1 in 3 people that recall the “It’s not OK” television advertising took action as a result of the advertising.

References and sources for each of these statistics are available on the statistics page of our website www.areyouok.org.nz/statistics