Campaign recognition

The work of the It's not OK campaign has been widely recognised in New Zealand and internationally:

  • 2009 Gold Quill Excellence Award for communications, from the International Association of Business Communicators.
  • 2010 Prime Minister’s Supreme Award for public sector communications, from the Institute of Public Administration of New Zealand; and winner of the public sector communications category.
  • 2011 Bronze Effie award for social marketing / public service in the marketing communications effectiveness, from the Communications Association of New Zealand.
  • 2011 Innovation award for New Zealand Rugby League’s work with It’s not OK, from the New Zealand Secondary Schools Sports Council.
  • 2012 Bronze Effie award for sustained success, from the Communications Association of New Zealand.
  • 2013 Prime Minister’s Supreme Award for public sector communications, from the Institute of Public Administration of New Zealand; and winner of the public sector communications category. It's not OK is the only entrant to win the supreme award twice.
  • 2013 Team member Sheryl Hann won a study award to visit organisations that run coordinated responses to family violence in the United Kingdom, Canada and Australia.

In 2011, research published in the international journal Trauma, Violence and Abuse compared New Zealand’s campaign with 15 others that target perpetrators of partner violence. It’s not OK messages and resources were found to have a strong alignment with evidence on the stages of behaviour change for perpetrators. It's not OK social marketing material provides a range of information that the authors believed would be effective in helping people who do not realise they have a problem with violence, through to those thinking about trying to change their behaviours and those trying to maintain a violence-free life. The findings confirm that It’s not OK’s approach is best practice: To be effective, campaigns aimed at people who use domestic/family violence should emphasise the benefits of change towards non-violence and aim to increase perpetrators' confidence that they can achieve a life without violence.